gloom

noun
1 sadness
ADJECTIVE
deep

She was in a deep gloom because not even a postcard had arrived from Ricky.

general (esp. BrE)
economic

the general economic gloom

VERB + GLOOM
be filled with, be sunk in, sink into

He was sunk in deep gloom at the prospect of being alone.

I sank into gloom and depression.

fill sb with

The news filled me with gloom.

cast

Talk of his ill health cast gloom over the celebrations.

dispel, lift (esp. BrE)

efforts to dispel their gloom

GLOOM + VERB
deepen, descend (both esp. BrE)

Their gloom deepened as the election results came in.

She felt gloom descend on her shoulders.

lift

When the gloom finally lifts, the pessimists will be surprised at how much has been going right.

PREPOSITION
in gloom

The nation was deep in gloom.

gloom about

There is a general gloom about the farming industry.

PHRASES
doom and gloom, gloom and despondency (BrE)

Despite falling demand, the year has not been all doom and gloom.

the darkest feelings of gloom and despondency

2 darkness
ADJECTIVE
deep
deepening, descending, gathering

He peered into the gathering gloom.

cold, damp
evening

The fog looked ominous in the evening gloom.

VERB + GLOOM
penetrate, pierce

The sound of distant police whistles pierced the gloom.

adjust to, become accustomed to, get accustomed to

Slowly, my eyes became accustomed to the gloom.

peer into, peer through
GLOOM + VERB
deepen (BrE), descend

We sat and watched as the gloom descended.

PREPOSITION
in the gloom

We lost sight of them in the gloom.

into the gloom

She watched him disappear into the gloom.

out of the gloom

Two figures materialized out of the gloom.

through the gloom

She could see the house faintly through the gloom.


Collocations dictionary. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • gloom´i|ly — gloom|y «GLOO mee», adjective, gloom|i|er, gloom|i|est. 1. full of gloom; dark; dim; obscure: »a gloomy winter day …   Useful english dictionary

  • gloom|y — «GLOO mee», adjective, gloom|i|er, gloom|i|est. 1. full of gloom; dark; dim; obscure: »a gloomy winter day …   Useful english dictionary

  • Gloom — may refer to:* Gloom, a melancholy, depressing or despondent atmosphere * Gloom (mod), a modification for Quake 2 * Gloom (game), a Doom clone for the Amiga computer * Gloom (Pokémon), a fictional species in the pokémon franchise * Gloom (X Men) …   Wikipedia

  • Gloom — (gl[=oo]m), n. [AS. gl[=o]m twilight, from the root of E. glow. See {Glow}, and cf. {Glum}, {Gloam}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Partial or total darkness; thick shade; obscurity; as, the gloom of a forest, or of midnight. [1913 Webster] 2. A shady,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • gloom — [ glum ] noun uncount * 1. ) darkness in which it is difficult to see clearly: Harry peered into the gathering gloom. 2. ) the feeling of having no hope: a time of high unemployment and economic gloom gloom over/about: There is general gloom… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • gloom — [glu:m] n [singular, U] 1.) literary almost complete darkness ▪ He peered into the gathering (=increasing) gloom. 2.) a feeling of great sadness and lack of hope ▪ a time of high unemployment and economic gloom →doom and gloom at ↑doom2 …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • Gloom — Gloom, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Gloomed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Glooming}.] 1. To shine or appear obscurely or imperfectly; to glimmer. [1913 Webster] 2. To become dark or dim; to be or appear dismal, gloomy, or sad; to come to the evening twilight. [1913 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Gloom — Gloom, v. t. 1. To render gloomy or dark; to obscure; to darken. [1913 Webster] A bow window . . . gloomed with limes. Walpole. [1913 Webster] A black yew gloomed the stagnant air. Tennyson. [1913 Webster] 2. To fill with gloom; to make sad,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • gloom — UK US /gluːm/ noun [U] ► feelings of worry that things are bad and will not improve: »There is widespread doom and gloom about the company s future. »The market gloom was caused by fears of recession …   Financial and business terms

  • gloom — vb lower, glower, *frown, scowl Contrasted words: *threaten, menace gloom n dejection, depression, melancholy, melancholia, *sadness, blues, dumps Analogous words: despondency, forlornness, hopelessness, despair, desperation (see under… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • gloom — [n1] melancholy, depression anguish, bitterness, blue devils*, blue funk*, blues*, catatonia, chagrin, cheerlessness, dejection, desolation, despair, despondency, disconsolateness, discouragement, dismals, distress, doldrums, dolor,… …   New thesaurus

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.