faith

noun
1 trust in sb/sth
ADJECTIVE
enormous, great, tremendous
absolute, complete, implicit, total, unshakable, unwavering
little

I have little faith in doctors these days.

blind

He seems to have a blind faith in his boss.

abiding

an artist whose work reflects his abiding faith in humanity

renewed
touching

She showed a touching faith in my ability to resolve any and every difficulty.

public

Business crime undermines public faith in the business system.

VERB + FAITH
have
pin (esp. BrE), place, put

He distrusted political systems and placed his faith in the genius of individuals.

She did not pin much faith on their chances of success.

show
share

I wish I shared your faith in the jury system.

lack, lose

people who lose faith in themselves

shake, undermine
destroy
renew, restore

They are trying to restore faith in the political system.

regain
retain

If the company can retain its customers' faith it could become the market leader.

affirm, express, proclaim
PREPOSITION
faith in

Her faith in human nature had been badly shaken.

PHRASES
an act of faith
a lack of faith
a leap of faith

These reforms are totally untested and will require a leap of faith on the part of teachers.

have every faith in sb
2 strong religious belief
ADJECTIVE
religious
deep, genuine, strong, true
simple
unquestioning
new-found

her new-found faith in Jesus

active

a large decline in the number of people who have an active faith of any sort

personal
VERB + FAITH
have
come to, find

He found faith gradually, rather than in a sudden conversion.

lack, lose
shake, undermine
regain
strengthen
proclaim
FAITH + NOUN
healer, healing
PREPOSITION
through faith

They believe that people can come to salvation through faith.

faith in

After her son's death she lost her faith in God.

PHRASES
an article of faith (often figurative)

the team's greatness was an article of faith for him (= a belief that could not be questioned).

3 religion
ADJECTIVE
living

Christianity is a living faith which has shaped their history.

world

The study of other world faiths is an important part of religious education.

Catholic, Jewish, Muslim, Sikh, etc.
VERB + FAITH
profess
practise/practice

Christians were allowed to practise/practice their faith unmolested by the authorities.

keep alive, uphold

Their aim was to keep alive the traditional Jewish faith.

pass on, preach, spread, teach

the role of parents in passing on the faith to their children

He felt the call to preach the faith to others.

FAITH + NOUN
tradition
community, group

a committee which is made up of members of different faith groups

school (BrE)

the debate on faith schools

PHRASES
people of different faiths
4 intention to do right
ADJECTIVE
bad, good

The judge did not find any bad faith (= intention to do wrong) on the part of the defendants.

VERB + FAITH
break (= break a promise to sb)
PHRASES
in bad faith

Thet had entered into the contract in bad faith.

in good faith

We printed the report in good faith, but have now learned that it was incorrect.

keep faith with sb

As manager, he was not prepared to keep faith with (= keep a promise to) the players who had failed him.

keep the faith

They kept the faith (= remained faithful) in the face of ridicule.


Collocations dictionary. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Faith — • In the Old Testament, the Hebrew word means essentially steadfastness. As signifying man s attitude towards God it means trustfulness or fiducia Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Faith     Faith …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Faith — is a belief in the trustworthiness of an idea. Formal usage of the word faith is usually reserved for concepts of religion, as in theology, where it almost universally refers to a trusting belief in a transcendent reality, or else in a Supreme… …   Wikipedia

  • faith — [feɪθ] noun [uncountable] 1. confidence that someone or something can be trusted or will work properly: faith in • We have faith in our staff. • Don t put too much faith in competition …   Financial and business terms

  • Faith —    Faith is in general the persuasion of the mind that a certain statement is true (Phil. 1:27; 2 Thess. 2:13). Its primary idea is trust. A thing is true, and therefore worthy of trust. It admits of many degrees up to full assurance of faith, in …   Easton's Bible Dictionary

  • faith — W2 [feıθ] n ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(trust/confidence in somebody/something)¦ 2¦(religion)¦ 3 break faith with somebody/something 4 keep faith with somebody/something 5 good faith 6 bad faith 7 an act of faith ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ [Date: 1200 1300; : Old French; Origin:… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • Faith — (f[=a]th), n. [OE. feith, fayth, fay, OF. feid, feit, fei, F. foi, fr. L. fides; akin to fidere to trust, Gr. pei qein to persuade. The ending th is perhaps due to the influence of such words as truth, health, wealth. See {Bid}, {Bide}, and cf.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Faith — bezeichnet: Orte in den Vereinigten Staaten: Faith (Arkansas) Faith (Minnesota) Faith (Missouri) Faith (North Carolina) Faith (South Dakota) Personen mit dem Familien oder Künstlernamen Faith Adam Faith (1940–2003), englischer Popsänger,… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • faith — [ feıθ ] noun *** 1. ) uncount strong belief in or trust of someone or something: have faith in: I m delighted to know you have such faith in me. lose faith in: The public have lost faith in what the government is doing. put your faith in… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • Faith — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Faith (en castellano: fe) puede referirse a: Música Faith (1981), álbum de la banda británica The Cure; Faith (1987), álbum de George Michael; Faith (1987), canción de George Michael; Faith (2003), canción de Celine… …   Wikipedia Español

  • faith — [fāth] n. [ME feith < OFr feid, fei < L fides, confidence, belief (in LL(Ec), the Christian religion) < fidere, to trust < IE base * bheidh , to urge, be convinced > BIDE, Gr peithein, to persuade, L foedus, a compact] 1.… …   English World dictionary

  • faith — n 1 a: allegiance or loyalty to a duty or a person b: sincerity or honesty of intentions see also bad faith, good faith 2: fidelity to one s promises and obligations …   Law dictionary

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