failure

noun
1 lack of success
ADJECTIVE
complete, total
abject, humiliating

The attempt ended in abject failure.

inevitable
costly
alleged, apparent, perceived
relative
initial

Initial failure was followed by unexpected, if modest, success.

ultimate

War is the ultimate failure of public communication.

personal
moral
academic
economic, financial
military
VERB + FAILURE
be doomed to, end in, result in

All her efforts were doomed to failure.

admit, tolerate

He was too proud to admit failure.

I will not tolerate failure.

lament

He lamented his failure to formulate a satisfactory theory.

explain
attribute, blame

He attributes the failure of the project to lack of government support.

I blame the failure of our relationship on my husband.

expect

Children who are doing badly tend to expect failure and criticism.

fear
avoid
FAILURE + NOUN
rate

There is a high failure rate with this treatment.

PHRASES
fear of failure

Fear of failure should not deter you from trying.

a history of failure

John had a long history of academic failure.

a possibility of failure, a risk of failure
a sense of failure
2 unsuccessful person/thing
ADJECTIVE
big, great, serious
complete, total, utter
catastrophic, disastrous
abject, conspicuous, dismal, humiliating, lamentable (esp. BrE), miserable
costly
heroic (BrE)

If she could not succeed, she would at least be a heroic failure.

alleged, apparent, perceived
relative
past

to learn from past failures

rare (esp. BrE)

The movie was one of the rare failures in his career.

unexpected
personal
collective
moral
academic
economic, financial

economic failure and increasing unemployment

military
VERB + FAILURE
be, represent
prove

The venture proved a costly failure.

experience, have
feel (BrE), feel like (esp. AmE)

I felt (like) a complete failure.

consider sb/sth, regard sb/sth as
brand sb/sth (esp. BrE)

Her parents had long since branded her a failure.

FAILURE + VERB
arise from sth

failures arising from circumstances beyond your control

PREPOSITION
failure of

The decision to withdraw funding represents a failure of imagination.

3 not doing sth
ADJECTIVE
fundamental
general
manifest
consistent, constant, continued, continuing, persistent, repeated
government, management

government failure to listen to the voice of the electorate

VERB + FAILURE
excuse, justify

Nothing can excuse your failure to ask my permission.

constitute

This breach constitutes a serious failure in performance.

4 of a machine, system, part of the body, etc.
ADJECTIVE
mechanical, structural, technical
battery, brake, component, computer, engine, equipment, power, system
hardware, software (both computing)
bank, business, commercial, company, corporate, institutional, market

Business failures rose by 30% in 2001.

heart, kidney, liver, organ

the commonest cause of acute liver failure

cardiac, hepatic, renal, respiratory (all medical)

patients with chronic renal failure

crop, harvest
communication
intelligence, policy
VERB + FAILURE
cause, lead to, result in

a rare viral infection that can lead to heart failure

experience, suffer

The aircraft seems to have experienced an engine failure.

prevent
FAILURE + VERB
occur

A power failure occurred between 4 and 5 p.m.

PREPOSITION
failure in

a failure in the computer system


Collocations dictionary. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • failure — fail·ure n 1: omission of occurrence or performance; specif: a failing to perform a duty or expected action a failure to mitigate damages failure to prosecute 2: a lack of success or adequacy failure of a suit 3: a failing in business …   Law dictionary

  • failure — fail‧ure [ˈfeɪljə ǁ ər] noun 1. [countable, uncountable] COMMERCE a situation in which a business that is not successful has to close because it is losing money: • The Official Receiver recommended a detailed investigation into the reasons for… …   Financial and business terms

  • failure — failure, neglect, default, miscarriage, dereliction are comparable when they mean an omission on the part of someone or something of what is expected or required oj him or of it. Failure basically implies a being found wanting; it implies a lack… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Failure — Fail ure, n. [From {Fail}.] 1. Cessation of supply, or total defect; a failing; deficiency; as, failure of rain; failure of crops. [1913 Webster] 2. Omission; nonperformance; as, the failure to keep a promise. [1913 Webster] 3. Want of success;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Failure — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Failure fue una banda de rock alternativo en la década de los 90. Contenido 1 Historia 2 Post Failure 3 Discografía 4 …   Wikipedia Español

  • Failure — est un groupe de rock américain fondé dans les années 90 par Ken Andrews (chanteur, guitariste), Greg Edwards (bassiste) et Robert Gauss (batteur). Sommaire 1 Histoire 2 Discographie 2.1 Albums 2.2 Autres …   Wikipédia en Français

  • failure — [n1] lack of success abortion, bankruptcy, bomb, botch*, breakdown, bungle*, bust, checkmate, collapse, decay, decline, defeat, deficiency, deficit, deterioration, downfall, failing, false step*, faux pas, fiasco, flash in the pan*, flop*,… …   New thesaurus

  • Failure — Failure. См. Отказ. (Источник: «Металлы и сплавы. Справочник.» Под редакцией Ю.П. Солнцева; НПО Профессионал , НПО Мир и семья ; Санкт Петербург, 2003 г.) …   Словарь металлургических терминов

  • failure — (see also bankruptcy and insolvency) an economic assessment of the viability of a business, it means that a firm is either not earning what is expected (i.e. it has a below normal rate of return) or is not meeting its obligations. It is not… …   Glossary of Bankruptcy

  • failure — 1640s, failer, from Anglo Fr. failer, from O.Fr. falir (see FAIL (Cf. fail)). The verb in Anglo French used as a noun; ending altered 17c. to conform with words in ure …   Etymology dictionary

  • failure — ► NOUN 1) lack of success. 2) an unsuccessful person or thing. 3) the omission of expected or required action. 4) an instance or the state of not functioning …   English terms dictionary

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