excess

{{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}}
noun
1 too much of sth
ADJECTIVE
rhetorical, stylistic, verbal

His statements cannot be simply dismissed as rhetorical excess.

financial
scandalous, wretched (AmE)

Washington has always been a city of wretched excesses.

alcoholic (BrE)
worst excesses

the worst excesses of the 1980s

VERB + EXCESS
avoid, contain, curb

‘Avoid excess’ is the golden rule for a healthy life.

commit excesses, perpetrate excesses

the worst excesses committed by the occupying army

PREPOSITION
in excess

The drug can be harmful if taken in excess.

to excess

They never smoked or drank to excess.

2 an amount by which sth is larger than sth else
ADJECTIVE
large
slight
PREPOSITION
in excess of

The car can travel at speeds in excess of 150 miles per hour.

excess of

a large excess of gas

{{Roman}}II.{{/Roman}}
adj.
Excess is used with these nouns: ↑alcohol, ↑baggage, ↑calorie, ↑capacity, ↑demand, ↑dirt, ↑energy, ↑fat, ↑fluid, ↑heat, ↑inventory, ↑moisture, ↑mucus, ↑profit, ↑return, ↑speed, ↑supply, ↑water, ↑weight

Collocations dictionary. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Excess — Ex*cess , n. [OE. exces, excess, ecstasy, L. excessus a going out, loss of self possession, fr. excedere, excessum, to go out, go beyond: cf. F. exc[ e]s. See {Exceed}.] 1. The state of surpassing or going beyond limits; the being of a measure… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • excess — ex·cess adj: more than a usual or specified amount; specif: additional to an amount specified under another insurance policy excess coverage excess insurance Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996 …   Law dictionary

  • excess — n Excess, superfluity, surplus, surplusage, overplus denote something which goes beyond a limit or bound. Excess applies to whatever exceeds a limit, measure, bound, or accustomed degree {in measure rein thy joy; scant this excess Shak.} {the… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Excess-3 — binary coded decimal (XS 3), also called biased representation or Excess N, is a numeral system used on some older computers that uses a pre specified number N as a biasing value. It is a way to represent values with a balanced number of positive …   Wikipedia

  • excess — [ek ses′, ikses′; ] also, esp.for adj. [, ek′ses΄] n. [ME & OFr exces < L excessus < pp. of excedere: see EXCEED] 1. action or conduct that goes beyond the usual, reasonable, or lawful limit 2. lack of moderation; intemperance;… …   English World dictionary

  • Excess — is a state of something being present beyond a requisite amount. In certain contexts, it has a more specialized meaning:* In insurance, similar to deductible. * In chemistry, describing any reagent that is not the limiting reagent. * Excess is… …   Wikipedia

  • excess — (n.) late 14c., from O.Fr. exces (14c.) excess, extravagance, outrage, from L. excessus departure, a going beyond the bounds of reason or beyond the subject, from stem of excedere to depart, go beyond (see EXCEED (Cf. exceed)). As an adjective… …   Etymology dictionary

  • excess — [n1] overabundance of something balance, by product, enough, exorbitance, exuberance, fat, fulsomeness, glut, inundation, lavishness, leavings, leftover, luxuriance, nimiety, overdose, overflow, overkill, overload, overmuch, overrun, oversupply,… …   New thesaurus

  • excess — ► NOUN 1) an amount that is more than necessary, permitted, or desirable. 2) lack of moderation, especially in eating or drinking. 3) (excesses) outrageous or immoderate behaviour. 4) Brit. a part of an insurance claim to be paid by the insured.… …   English terms dictionary

  • excess — in an insurance policy, excess clauses specify that the policyholder will be responsible for a portion of claims under certain conditions. Glossary of Business Terms The dollar amount by which the equity exceeds the margin requirements in a… …   Financial and business terms

  • excess — ♦♦♦ excesses (The noun is pronounced [[t]ɪkse̱s[/t]]. The adjective is pronounced [[t]e̱kses[/t]].) 1) N VAR: with supp, usu a N of n An excess of something is a larger amount than is needed, allowed, or usual. An excess of houseplants in a small …   English dictionary

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