crime

noun
1 illegal act
ADJECTIVE
appalling (esp. BrE), awful, bloody, brutal, despicable, dreadful (esp. BrE), grave, great, heinous, horrible, horrific, serious, terrible, unspeakable, vicious

one of the most horrific crimes of recent times

big, major

the biggest crime since the Great Train Robbery

lesser, minor, petty

He was charged with the lesser crime of possession.

real

She claimed that the real crime is that burglars and muggers usually get a light sentence.

non-violent, violent
perfect

He boasted of having carried out the perfect crime.

notorious

one of the most notorious crimes in history

capital

After the reforms the only capital crimes were treason and murder.

alleged

She never faced trial for her many alleged crimes.

unsolved
copycat

the danger of copycat crimes in the wake of the shootings

motiveless

an apparently motiveless crime

victimless

Insider dealing has been called a victimless crime.

white-collar
drug, drug-related, gun
sex, sexual
hate

a hate crime against a young gay man

war
political
terrorist
federal (AmE)
VERB + CRIME
carry out, commit, do, perpetrate (formal)
report

Many crimes are never reported to the police.

investigate
solve

a man who solves crimes using old-fashioned detective work

prosecute (AmE)

a system of justice to prosecute crimes of terrorism

punish

Hate crimes are not punished severely enough in my opinion.

witness

a child who has just witnessed a violent crime

confess

He confessed his crime to his sister.

CRIME + VERB
involve sth

crimes involving firearms

happen, occur

The crime occurred in broad daylight.

be punishable by sth

crimes punishable by death

CRIME + NOUN
scene
victim
suspect
PREPOSITION
crime against

crimes against humanity

PHRASES
a crime of passion, a crime of violence
the scene of the crime

No weapon was found at the scene of the crime.

the punishment fits the crime

The punishment should fit the crime.

2 illegal activity in general
ADJECTIVE
serious
petty
non-violent, violent
recorded
unrecorded
growing, mounting, rising
rampant

a time of great poverty and rampant crime

white-collar

Identity theft is the fastest growing white-collar crime in the country.

corporate
organized
juvenile, youth
international, local
rural, urban
car, property, street
drug, drug-related, gun, knife

Gun crime is just part of an increasingly lawless society.

computer

attempts to prevent hacking and computer crime

VERB + CRIME
carry out, commit, perpetrate (formal)
combat, fight, tackle
beat, crack (informal)

Police forces will exchange ideas on cracking crime.

deter, prevent, stop
control, cut, reduce

How can we reduce knife crime in our cities?

detect, investigate

The public have a crucial role to play in detecting crime.

solve
punish
cause
be driven to, turn to

He says that bored youngsters turn to crime.

CRIME + VERB
double, increase, rise
CRIME + NOUN
figures, level, rate, statistics
control, prevention
problem, wave

the country's crime problem

spree
squad

a senior detective with the serious crime squad

investigation
lab (AmE, informal)

The computers were sent to a crime lab for analysis.

family (AmE), group, ring, syndicate

leading members of an organized crime syndicate

boss, lord

one of New York's biggest crime lords

drama, fiction, film (esp. BrE), movie (esp. AmE), novel, series, show (esp. AmE), story, thriller

the latest TV crime series

reporter, writer

the newspaper's crime reporter

a new short story by the popular crime writer

PHRASES
a crackdown on crime

a crackdown on drug-related crime

crime and disorder
crime and punishment
fear of crime

Fear of crime imprisons many elderly people in their homes.

an increase in crime
a life of crime

Unemployed young people were likely to be tempted into a life of crime.

sb's partner in crime
a victim of crime

Victims of crime may be able to obtain compensation.

◆◆◆
NOTE: Crimes
be guilty of … , commit … 

Two key witnesses at her trial committed perjury.

accuse sb of … , charge sb with … 

He has been accused of her murder.

convict sb of … , find sb guilty of … 

She was found guilty of high treason.

acquit sb of … 

The engineer responsible for the collapse of the bridge was acquitted of manslaughter.

admit … , confess to … , deny … 

She admitted 33 assault charges.

All three men have denied assault.

plead guilty/not guilty to … 

He pleaded guilty to a charge of illegal possession of explosives.

investigate (sb for) … 

She is being investigated for suspected bribery.

be suspected for/of … 

He was the least likely to be suspected of her murder.

be/come under investigation for … 

She was the second minister to come under investigation for corruption.

be wanted for … , be wanted on charges of … 

He was wanted on charges of espionage.

solve a case/crime/murder/robbery/theft

The police and the public must work together to solve the murder.

arrest sb for … 

Jean was arrested for arson.

be tried for … , stand trial for … 

to stand trial for extortion

 … case,  … trial

The nurse's murder trial continues.

 … charge

The police agreed to drop the conspiracy charges against him.

a charge of … , a count of … 

The jury convicted her on two counts of theft.


Collocations dictionary. 2013.

Synonyms:
, , (especially against human law), / , , , , , , (of a violent or high-handed nature)


Look at other dictionaries:

  • crime — [ krim ] n. m. • 1160; lat. crimen « accusation » 1 ♦ Sens large Manquement très grave à la morale, à la loi. ⇒ attentat, 1. délit, faute, 1. forfait , infraction, 3. mal, péché. Crime contre nature. « L intérêt que l on accuse de tous nos crimes …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • crime — / krīm/ n [Middle French, from Latin crimen fault, accusation, crime] 1: conduct that is prohibited and has a specific punishment (as incarceration or fine) prescribed by public law compare delict, tort 2: an offense against public law …   Law dictionary

  • crime — W2S2 [kraım] n [Date: 1200 1300; : Latin; Origin: crimen judgment, accusation, crime ] 1.) [U] illegal activities in general ▪ We moved here ten years ago because there was very little crime. ▪ Women commit far less crime than men. ▪ Police… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • crime — CRIME. s. m. Mauvaise action que les lois punissent. Crime capital. Grand crime. Crime atroce, détestable. Crime énorme. Crime inouï, noir, irrémissible. Commettre, faire un crime. Punir un crime. Pardonner un crime. Abolir un crime. L abolition… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie Française 1798

  • crime — CRIME. s. m. Action meschante & punissable par les loix. Crime capital. grand crime. crime atroce, detestable. crime enorme. crime inoüi, noir, irremissible. commettre, faire un crime. faire un crime à quelqu un de quelque chose, pour dire,… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • crime — [ kraım ] noun *** 1. ) count an illegal activity or action: commit a crime (=do something illegal): She was unaware that she had committed a crime. the scene of a crime (=where it happened): There were no apparent clues at the scene of the crime …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • crime — [kraɪm] noun LAW 1. [countable] a dishonest or immoral action that can be punished by law: • Insider trading is a crime here and in the U.S. 2. [uncountable] illegal activities in general: • We moved here ten years ago because there was very… …   Financial and business terms

  • Crime — (kr[imac]m), n. [F. crime, fr. L. crimen judicial decision, that which is subjected to such a decision, charge, fault, crime, fr. the root of cernere to decide judicially. See {Certain}.] 1. Any violation of law, either divine or human; an… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Crime — 〈[kraım] m. 6 oder n. 15〉 I 〈zählb.〉 Verbrechen, Gewalttat II 〈unz.; Sammelbez. für〉 Kriminalität; →a. Sex and Crime [engl.] * * * Crime [kra̮im ], das; s [engl. crime < afrz. crime < lat. crimen = Verbrechen]: engl. Bez. für: Verbrechen,… …   Universal-Lexikon

  • crime — Crime, et cas qu on a commis, Crimen. Un crime pour lequel y a peine de mort, ou d infamie, Capitale facinus, vel crimen. Crime de lese majesté, Perduellio. Pour certain crime ou cas, Certo nomine maleficij. Commettre un crime, ou faire une faute …   Thresor de la langue françoyse

  • crime — mid 13c., sinfulness, from O.Fr. crimne (12c., Mod.Fr. crime), from L. crimen (gen. criminis) charge, indictment, accusation; crime, fault, offense, perhaps from cernere to decide, to sift (see CRISIS (Cf. crisis)). But Klein (citing Brugmann)… …   Etymology dictionary

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.