break

{{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}}
noun
1 short rest; short holiday/vacation
ADJECTIVE
little, quick, short
coffee, dinner (esp. BrE), lunch, tea (BrE)
Christmas, Easter, holiday

Are you going away for the Easter break?

spring, summer, winter
weekend (esp. BrE)

I won a weekend break in Paris.

10-minute, two-week, etc.

We have a 15-minute break in the morning.

VERB + BREAK
have, take

We'll take a break now and resume in an hour.

need, want
deserve
enjoy
BREAK + NOUN
time (= between lessons at school) (BrE)
PREPOSITION
at break (BrE)

I'll see you at break.

during (a/the) break

I had a word with John during the break.

without a break

We worked all day without a break.

break for

a break for lunch

break from

a break from caring for the children

2 change/interruption in sth
ADJECTIVE
clean, complete, sharp
career
commercial (esp. AmE)
nice, welcome (esp. BrE)
VERB + BREAK
make

His new work makes a break with the past.

I wanted to leave but was nervous about making the break.

PREPOSITION
break from

a break from tradition

break in

a break in the weather

break with
3 opportunity
ADJECTIVE
big, lucky
VERB + BREAK
get

I always knew I would get my lucky break one day.

give sb

He's the director who gave her her first big break.

{{Roman}}II.{{/Roman}}
verb
ADVERB
easily
in half, in two

She broke the bar in two and gave a piece to me.

apart, up

She broke the chocolate up into small pieces.

PREPOSITION
into

The glass broke into hundreds of pieces.

PHRASAL VERBS
break down
1 fail
ADVERB
completely, irretrievably

Their marriage had broken down irretrievably.

eventually
2 start crying
PHRASES
break down and cry, break down in tears

She broke down in tears as she spoke to reporters.

break off
ADVERB
abruptly, immediately

He broke off abruptly when Jo walked in.

PREPOSITION
from

She broke off from the conversation to answer the telephone.

Break is used with these nouns as the subject: ↑cloud, ↑dam, ↑dawn, ↑day, ↑daylight, ↑egg, ↑elastic, ↑glass, ↑heart, ↑nail, ↑nerve, ↑news, ↑scandal, ↑spring, ↑stem, ↑storm, ↑story, ↑string, ↑surf, ↑swell, ↑twig, ↑voice, ↑wave, ↑weather, ↑window, ↑zip
Break is used with these nouns as the object: ↑agreement, ↑ankle, ↑arm, ↑back, ↑barrier, ↑blockade, ↑bond, ↑bone, ↑camp, ↑ceasefire, ↑ceiling, ↑chain, ↑chocolate, ↑circuit, ↑code, ↑concentration, ↑confidence, ↑confidentiality, ↑connection, ↑consensus, ↑continuity, ↑contract, ↑convention, ↑cover, ↑curfew, ↑curse, ↑cycle, ↑date, ↑deadlock, ↑drought, ↑egg, ↑embargo, ↑engagement, ↑faith, ↑fall, ↑fast, ↑finger, ↑fingernail, ↑flow, ↑glass, ↑habit, ↑heart, ↑hip, ↑hold, ↑hole, ↑huddle, ↑illusion, ↑impasse, ↑jaw, ↑journey, ↑law, ↑lease, ↑leg, ↑limit, ↑link, ↑lock, ↑mark, ↑mirror, ↑monopoly, ↑mood, ↑mould, ↑nail, ↑neck, ↑news, ↑nose, ↑oath, ↑pact, ↑pane, ↑parole, ↑pelvis, ↑pledge, ↑precedent, ↑promise, ↑quiet, ↑record, ↑regulation, ↑resistance, ↑rhythm, ↑rib, ↑routine, ↑rule, ↑sabbath, ↑seal, ↑shoelace, ↑siege, ↑silence, ↑skin, ↑skyline, ↑speed limit, ↑spell, ↑spine, ↑spirit, ↑spring, ↑stalemate, ↑stem, ↑stereotype, ↑stillness, ↑stone, ↑story, ↑streak, ↑stride, ↑strike, ↑string, ↑surface, ↑suspense, ↑symmetry, ↑taboo, ↑tackle, ↑tension, ↑tie, ↑toe, ↑tooth, ↑tradition, ↑train, ↑trance, ↑treaty, ↑truce, ↑trust, ↑twig, ↑vase, ↑vow, ↑will, ↑window, ↑windscreen, ↑word, ↑wrist

Collocations dictionary. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Break — (br[=a]k), v. t. [imp. {broke} (br[=o]k), (Obs. {Brake}); p. p. {Broken} (br[=o] k n), (Obs. {Broke}); p. pr. & vb. n. {Breaking}.] [OE. breken, AS. brecan; akin to OS. brekan, D. breken, OHG. brehhan, G. brechen, Icel. braka to creak, Sw. braka …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Break — (br[=a]k), v. i. 1. To come apart or divide into two or more pieces, usually with suddenness and violence; to part; to burst asunder. [1913 Webster] 2. To open spontaneously, or by pressure from within, as a bubble, a tumor, a seed vessel, a bag …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • break — vb Break, crack, burst, bust, snap, shatter, shiver are comparable as general terms meaning fundamentally to come apart or cause to come apart. Break basically implies the operation of a stress or strain that will cause a rupture, a fracture, a… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • break — ► VERB (past broke; past part. broken) 1) separate into pieces as a result of a blow, shock, or strain. 2) make or become inoperative; stop working. 3) interrupt (a continuity, sequence, or course). 4) fail to observe (a law, regulation, or… …   English terms dictionary

  • break — [brāk] vt. broke, broken, breaking [ME breken < OE brecan < IE base * bhreg > BREACH, BREECH, Ger brechen, L frangere] 1. to cause to come apart by force; split or crack sharply into pieces; smash; burst 2. a) …   English World dictionary

  • break — / brāk/ vb broke / brōk/, bro·ken, / brō kən/, break·ing, / brā kiŋ/ vt 1 a: violate transgress break the law …   Law dictionary

  • break — [n1] fissure, opening breach, cleft, crack, discontinuity, disjunction, division, fracture, gap, gash, hole, rent, rift, rupture, schism, split, tear; concepts 230,757 Ant. association, attachment, binding, combination, fastening, juncture break… …   New thesaurus

  • Break — (br[=a]k), n. [See {Break}, v. t., and cf. {Brake} (the instrument), {Breach}, {Brack} a crack.] 1. An opening made by fracture or disruption. [1913 Webster] 2. An interruption of continuity; change of direction; as, a break in a wall; a break in …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • break-up — break ups also breakup 1) N COUNT: usu N of n, n N The break up of a marriage, relationship, or association is the act of it finishing or coming to an end because the people involved decide that it is not working successfully. Since the break up… …   English dictionary

  • break up — {v.} 1. To break into pieces. * /The workmen broke up the pavement to dig up the pipes under it./ * /River ice breaks up in the spring./ 2. {informal} To lose or destroy spirit or self control. Usually used in the passive. * /Mrs. Lawrence was… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • break up — {v.} 1. To break into pieces. * /The workmen broke up the pavement to dig up the pipes under it./ * /River ice breaks up in the spring./ 2. {informal} To lose or destroy spirit or self control. Usually used in the passive. * /Mrs. Lawrence was… …   Dictionary of American idioms

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