tuck

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noun
Tuck is used after these nouns: ↑tummy
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verb
ADVERB
carefully, discreetly, neatly
gently
firmly
tightly

knees tucked tightly against her chest

cosily/cozily, safely, snugly

The children were safely tucked up in bed.

securely

He had securely tucked his phone away in his pocket.

away, in, up

The boys tucked their shirts in.

PREPOSITION
behind

The pool was tucked away behind a screen of trees.

beneath

the pillow that was gently tucked beneath her head

between

a puppy with its tail tucked between its legs

inside

He tucked the map inside his shirt.

into

He tucked his jeans neatly into his boots.

under, underneath

She tucked the newspaper under her arm.

Tuck is used with these nouns as the object: ↑knee, ↑napkin, ↑strand

Collocations dictionary. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Tuck — Tuck, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Tucked}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Tucking}.] [OE. tukken, LG. tukken to pull up, tuck up, entice; akin to OD. tocken to entice, G. zucken to draw with a short and quick motion, and E. tug. See {Tug}.] 1. To draw up; to shorten; …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Tuck — ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Amos Tuck (1810−1879), US amerikanischer Politiker (New Hampshire) Leon Tuck (1890−1953), US amerikanischer Eishockeyspieler Raphael Tuck (1821−1900), Gründer der Firma Raphael Tuck Sons Roderick Tuck (*… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • tuck — tuck1 [tuk] vt. [ME tuken < MDu tucken, to tuck & OE tucian, to ill treat, lit., to tug, akin to Ger zucken, to jerk: for IE base see TUG] 1. to pull up or gather up in a fold or folds; draw together so as to make shorter [to tuck up one s… …   English World dictionary

  • tuck — ► VERB 1) push, fold, or turn under or between two surfaces. 2) draw (part of one s body) together into a small space. 3) (often tuck away) store in a secure or secret place. 4) (tuck in/up) settle (someone) in bed by pulling the edges of the… …   English terms dictionary

  • tuck up — ˌtuck ˈup [transitive] [present tense I/you/we/they tuck up he/she/it tucks up present participle tucking up past tense …   Useful english dictionary

  • Tuck — Tuck, n. 1. A horizontal sewed fold, such as is made in a garment, to shorten it; a plait. [1913 Webster] 2. A small net used for taking fish from a larger one; called also {tuck net}. [1913 Webster] 3. A pull; a lugging. [Obs.] See {Tug}. Life… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Tuck — Tuck, n. [F. estoc; cf. It. stocco; both of German origin, and akin to E. stock. See {Stock}.] A long, narrow sword; a rapier. [Obs.] Shak. [1913 Webster] He wore large hose, and a tuck, as it was then called, or rapier, of tremendous length. Sir …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • tuck|in — «TUHK IHN», noun. British Slang. a hearty meal; feast: »One good tuckin won t give you an ulcer (Scottish Sunday Express). ╂[< tuck1 eatables + in] tuck in «TUHK IHN», adjective, noun. –adj. that can or should be tucked in: »a tuck in blouse… …   Useful english dictionary

  • Tuck — Tuck, v. i. To contract; to draw together. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Tuck — Tuck, n. [Cf. {Tocsin}.] The beat of a drum. Scot. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • tuck — tək n a cosmetic surgical operation for the removal of excess skin or fat from a body part see TUMMY TUCK …   Medical dictionary

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