prejudice

{{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}}
noun
ADJECTIVE
deep, deep-rooted, deep-seated, strong
blatant
serious (esp. BrE), unfair (esp. BrE)
personal
popular

She has not been afraid to challenge popular prejudices.

old

It's hard to break down old prejudices.

blind, irrational
anti-Catholic, anti-gay, etc.
class, colour/color (esp. AmE), cultural, ethnic, political, race (esp. AmE), racial, religious, sexist, social
VERB + PREJUDICE
have, hold

We all have prejudices of some kind.

air, express

He sat there airing his personal prejudices.

appeal to, pander to

We must not pander to the irrational prejudices of a small minority.

confirm, reinforce
encounter

She had never encountered such deep prejudice before.

confront, face
suffer
challenge, fight
overcome, put aside

It's time to put aside our old prejudices.

break down, eliminate, eradicate
PREPOSITION
without prejudice

The tale is told without prejudice or bias.

prejudice about

a book written to challenge prejudices about disabled people

prejudice against

deep-rooted prejudice against homosexuals

prejudice among

prejudice among ignorant people

prejudice towards/toward

prejudice towards/toward immigrants

PHRASES
a victim of prejudice
{{Roman}}II.{{/Roman}}
verb
1 cause sb to have a prejudice
ADVERB
unfairly
PREPOSITION
against, in favour/favor of

Newspaper reports had unfairly prejudiced the jury in her favour/favor.

2 (law) weaken sth/make it less fair
ADVERB
seriously, severely, substantially

This could seriously prejudice her safety.

unduly
VERB + PREJUDICE
be likely to

She did not disclose evidence that was likely to prejudice her client's case.

Prejudice is used with these nouns as the object: ↑chance

Collocations dictionary. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Prejudice — prejudice …   Dictionary of sociology

  • préjudice — [ preʒydis ] n. m. • 1265; lat. præjudicium « jugement anticipé », de præjudicare « préjuger » 1 ♦ Perte d un bien, d un avantage par le fait d autrui; acte ou événement nuisible aux intérêts de qqn et le plus souvent contraire au droit, à la… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • prejudice — prej·u·dice 1 / pre jə dəs/ n [Old French, from Latin praejudicium previous judgment, damage, from prae before + judicium judgment] 1: injury or detriment to one s legal rights or claims (as from the action of another): as a: substantial… …   Law dictionary

  • prejudice — Prejudice, in normal usage, means preconceived opinion or bias, against or in favour of, a person or thing. While it is important to remember that biases can be positive as well as negative, nevertheless the term most commonly refers to a… …   Dictionary of sociology

  • préjudice — Préjudice. s. m. Tort, dommage. Notable préjudice. préjudice fort considerable. porter préjudice à quelqu un, luy causer, luy faire un grand préjudice. souffrir un grand préjudice. cela me seroit d un grand préjudice. On dit, Au préjudice de sa… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • Prejudice — Préjudice Cette page d’homonymie répertorie les différents sujets et articles partageant un même nom. Sommaire 1 Droit 2 Cinéma 3 Musique …   Wikipédia en Français

  • prejudice — Prejudice, m. penac. Est avantjugé, un jugement donné qui fait consequence à ce qui reste à juger, Praeiudicium. Voilà pourquoy on en use pour dommage, comme, Cela tourne à mon grand prejudice, Id magno mihi est detrimento. Et, Sans prejudice de… …   Thresor de la langue françoyse

  • Prejudice — Prej u*dice, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Prejudiced}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Prejudicing}.] [Cf. F. pr[ e]judicier. See {Prejudice}, n.] 1. To cause to have prejudice; to prepossess with opinions formed without due knowledge or examination; to bias the mind… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • prejudice — [prej′ə dis] n. [ME < MFr < L praejudicium < prae , before (see PRE ) + judicium, judgment < judex (gen. judicis), JUDGE] 1. a judgment or opinion formed before the facts are known; preconceived idea, favorable or, more usually,… …   English World dictionary

  • prejudice — in the meaning ‘bias’ or ‘partiality’, is followed by against or in favour of, but not (on the analogy of hostility, objection, etc.) to: a prejudice against eating late, not ☒ a prejudice to eating late. In its meaning ‘irrational dislike’, it… …   Modern English usage

  • prejudice — ► NOUN 1) preconceived opinion that is not based on reason or experience. 2) unjust behaviour formed on such a basis. 3) chiefly Law harm that may result from some action or judgement. ► VERB 1) give rise to prejudice in (someone); make biased.… …   English terms dictionary

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