oblige

verb
ADVERB
duly (BrE)

The fans were looking for another goal and Owen duly obliged (= he scored).

kindly
gladly, happily, willingly
grudgingly
VERB + OBLIGE
be glad to, be happy to, be pleased to (esp. BrE), be willing to

He asked me for advice, and I was only too happy to oblige.

The staff are always willing to oblige.

PREPOSITION
by

Will you oblige by filling in this form?

with

Would you be willing to oblige us with some information?


Collocations dictionary. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • obligé — obligé, ée [ ɔbliʒe ] adj. • XIIIe; de obliger A ♦ (Personnes) 1 ♦ Tenu, lié par une obligation, assujetti par une nécessité. Dr. Une personne obligée envers un créancier. N. Le principal obligé : le débiteur principal (opposé à caution). Être,… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • obligé — obligé, ée (o bli jé, jée) part. passé d obliger. 1°   Lié par quelque chose dont on ne peut se dégager. •   Elle sera obligée à son voeu ; et elle accomplira effectivement tout ce qu elle aura promis et juré, SACI Bible, Nombr. XXX, 45. •   Je… …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • oblige — o‧blige [əˈblaɪdʒ] verb 1. [transitive] to make it necessary for someone to do something: oblige be obliged to do something • As a result of falling profits, we were obliged to close the factory. 2. [intransitive, transitive] to do something that …   Financial and business terms

  • oblige — 1 constrain, coerce, compel, *force Analogous words: *tie, bind 2 Oblige, accommodate, favor mean to do a service or courtesy. To oblige a person is to make him indebted by doing something that is pleasing to him {Punch was always anxious to… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • oblige — index accommodate, aid, assist, bear (support), bestow, bind (obligate), call ( …   Law dictionary

  • oblige — [v1] require bind, coerce, command, compel, constrain, force, impel, make, necessitate, obligate, shotgun*; concepts 14,242,646 Ant. let off oblige [v2] do a favor or kindness accommodate, aid, assist, avail, bend over backward*, benefit, come… …   New thesaurus

  • oblige — [ə blīj′, ōblīj′] vt. obliged, obliging [ME obligen < OFr obligier < L obligare, to bind, oblige < ob (see OB ) + ligare, to bind: see LIGATURE] 1. to compel by moral, legal, or physical force; constrain 2. to make indebted for a favor… …   English World dictionary

  • Oblige — O*blige ([ o]*bl[imac]j ; 277), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Obliged} ([ o]*bl[imac]jd ); p. pr. & vb. n. {Obliging} ([ o]*bl[imac] j[i^]ng).] [OF. obligier, F. obliger, L. obligare; ob (see {Ob }) + ligare to bind. See {Ligament}, and cf. {Obligate}.] 1 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • oblige — (v.) c.1300, to bind by oath, from O.Fr. obligier (13c.), from L. obligare to bind, put under obligation, from ob to (see OB (Cf. ob )) + ligare to bind, from PIE root *leig to bind (see LIGAMENT (Cf. li …   Etymology dictionary

  • oblige — ► VERB 1) compel legally or morally. 2) perform a service or favour for. 3) (be obliged) be indebted or grateful. ORIGIN Latin obligare, from ligare to bind …   English terms dictionary

  • oblige — o|blige S3 [əˈblaıdʒ] v formal [Date: 1200 1300; : Old French; Origin: obliger, from Latin obligare, from ligare to tie ] 1.) [T usually passive] if you are obliged to do something, you have to do it because the situation, the law, a duty etc… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

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