magistrate

noun
ADJECTIVE
examining (BrE), investigating, licensing (BrE)
chief, senior (BrE)
presiding (BrE)
city (esp. BrE), county, district (esp. BrE), federal, local, town (esp. BrE)
stipendiary (BrE)
VERB + MAGISTRATE
appoint sb, appoint sb as (both BrE)
appear before, come up before (both BrE)

He is due to appear before magistrates on a charge of assault.

MAGISTRATE + VERB
hear sth (BrE)

The man had a history of violence, magistrates heard yesterday.

decide sth, rule sth

The magistrate ruled that there wasn't enough evidence.

ban sb, convict sb, fine sb, remand sb in custody, sentence sb (all BrE)

Magistrates banned him from driving for thirty days.

impose sth, order sth (both BrE)

Magistrates imposed an Anti-Social Behaviour Order.

A magistrate ordered that they return to the UK.

grant sth (BrE)

Magistrates granted the application for a drinks licence.

adjourn sth (BrE)

Magistrates adjourned the case until June 9.

sit (BrE)

Magistrates sitting in Andover imposed a three-year sentence.

MAGISTRATE + NOUN
judge (AmE)
PHRASES
magistrates' court (in the UK)

Collocations dictionary. 2013.

Synonyms:
(in civil service)


Look at other dictionaries:

  • magistrate — mag·is·trate / ma jə ˌstrāt, strət/ n [Latin magistratus magistracy, magistrate, from magistr magister master, political superior] 1: a civil or judicial official vested with limited judicial powers a family support magistrate a traffic… …   Law dictionary

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  • magistrate — (n.) late 14c., civil officer in charge of administering laws, from O.Fr. magistrat, from L. magistratus a magistrate, public functionary, originally magisterial rank or office, from magistrare serve as a magistrate, from magister chief, director …   Etymology dictionary

  • magistrate — [maj′istrāt΄, maj′istrit] n. [ME < L magistratus < magister,MASTER] 1. a civil officer empowered to administer the law: the President of the U.S. is sometimes called chief magistrate 2. a minor official with limited judicial powers, as a… …   English World dictionary

  • Magistrate — Mag is*trate, n. [L. magistratus, fr. magister master: cf. F. magistrat. See {Master}.] A person clothed with power as a public civil officer; a public civil officer invested with the executive government, or some branch of it. All Christian… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • magistrate — [n] civil officer bailiff, JP, judge, justice, justice of the peace; concept 354 …   New thesaurus

  • magistrate — ► NOUN ▪ a civil officer who administers the law, especially one who conducts a court concerned with minor offences and holds preliminary hearings for more serious ones. ORIGIN Latin magistratus administrator , from magister master …   English terms dictionary

  • Magistrate — For the musical group, see Magistrates (band). Magistrate Sir Lyman Poore Duff, a former judge of the Supreme Court of Canada Occupation Names Judge, Justice of the Peace, magistrat …   Wikipedia

  • magistrate — A judge or justice of an inferior court; a mayor; a justice of the peace. A judge of court, such as a police court, mayor s court, or justice s court, the jurisdiction of which is restricted to the trial of misdemeanors and the conducting of… …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • Magistrate —    A public civil officer invested with authority. The Hebrew shophetim, or judges, were magistrates having authority in the land (Deut. 1:16, 17). In Judg. 18:7 the word magistrate (A.V.) is rendered in the Revised Version possessing authority …   Easton's Bible Dictionary

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