forecast


forecast
{{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}}
noun
ADJECTIVE
good, optimistic
gloomy, pessimistic
conservative
accurate, correct
detailed
revised
annual
early
long-range, long-term

a long-range weather forecast

short-term

a short-term forecast of the economy

local
official
economic, financial, market, shipping (BrE) (shipping news in AmE), weather
cash-flow (esp. BrE), earnings, growth, inflation, profit, revenue, sales
VERB + FORECAST
prepare, produce
give, issue, make, provide

The government has issued a pessimistic economic forecast.

revise, update
lower, raise

This week the company is expected to raise its revenue forecast.

rely on
check

Check the weather forecast before you set out.

be in line with

The interest rate is in line with the forecast.

FORECAST + VERB
call for sth (AmE), predict sth, say sth, suggest sth

This morning's weather forecast called for snow.

Some forecasts suggest that the increase in heart disease will continue for some time.

assume sth
be based on sth

forecasts based on a complicated procedure

PREPOSITION
forecast about

Forecasts about the economy are often misleading.

forecast for

forecasts for earnings in 2015

forecast of

forecasts of population growth

{{Roman}}II.{{/Roman}}
verb
ADVERB
accurately, correctly
originally, previously

higher costs than those originally forecast

VERB + FORECAST
be difficult to, be hard to
Forecast is used with these nouns as the object: ↑demand, ↑future, ↑rain, ↑return, ↑weather

Collocations dictionary. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Forecast — Fore*cast , v. t. 1. To plan beforehand; to scheme; to project. [1913 Webster] He shall forecast his devices against the strongholds. Dan. xi. 24. [1913 Webster] 2. To foresee; to calculate beforehand, so as to provide for; as, to forecast the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Forecast — Fore cast, n. Previous contrivance or determination; predetermination. [1913 Webster] He makes this difference to arise from the forecast and predetermination of the gods themselves. Addison. [1913 Webster] 2. A calculation predicting future… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • forecast — [fôr′kast΄; ] for v., also [ fôr kast′] vt. forecast or forecasted, forecasting [ME forecasten < fore (see FORE) + casten, to contrive: see CAST] 1. Archaic to foresee 2. to estimate or calculate in advance; predict or seek to predict (weather …   English World dictionary

  • Forecast — Fore*cast , v. i. To contrive or plan beforehand. [1913 Webster] If it happen as I did forecast. Milton. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • forecast — is pronounced with the stress on the first syllable both as a noun and as a verb. As a past form and past participle, forecast (identical to the form of the present tense) has more or less ousted forecasted …   Modern English usage

  • forecast — [n] prediction, often of weather or business anticipation, augury, budget, calculation, cast, conjecture, divination, estimate, foreknowledge, foreseeing, foresight, foretelling, forethought, foretoken, guess, outlook, planning, precognition,… …   New thesaurus

  • forecast — ► VERB (past and past part. forecast or forecasted) ▪ predict or estimate (a future event or trend). ► NOUN ▪ a prediction or estimate, especially of the weather or a financial trend. DERIVATIVES forecaster noun …   English terms dictionary

  • forecast — index anticipate (prognosticate), contrive, expect (consider probable), foreseen, forewarn, herald …   Law dictionary

  • forecast — vb predict, *foretell, prophesy, prognosticate, augur, presage, portend, forebode Analogous words: *foresee, foreknow, anticipate, apprehend, divine: surmise, Conjecture, guess: *infer, gather, conclude …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • forecast — ▪ I. forecast fore‧cast 1 [ˈfɔːkɑːst ǁ ˈfɔːrkæst] noun [countable] ECONOMICS a description of what is likely to happen in the future, based on information that is available now: • The figures for 2001 are forecasts, the others are actuals. • a… …   Financial and business terms


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