expectation


expectation
noun (usually expectations)
ADJECTIVE
big, great, high, lofty (esp. AmE)
modest

I have modest expectations about what my research can accomplish.

low

Many children start with low expectations.

growing, rising
heightened, increased, raised

Heightened expectations for educational progress had not been realized.

diminished, lowered
optimistic, positive
negative, pessimistic
normal

It doesn't conform to people's normal expectations of what a zoo is.

clear, confident
legitimate (law), rational, realistic, reasonable
false, inflated, naive, unrealistic, unreasonable
disappointed, unfulfilled, unmet (esp. AmE)

Low growth is likely to bring unfulfilled expectations.

wild

This realization of our dreams surpassed even our wildest expectations.

initial, original

They've found success far beyond their initial expectations.

prior

This result is contrary to our prior expectations.

future
common, general, widespread

There is still a general expectation that married couples will have children.

popular, public
conventional, traditional
family, parental
cultural, social, societal (esp. AmE)
gender (esp. AmE)

Religion reinforces traditional gender expectations to varying extents.

consumer, customer
market
economic, financial, inflation, inflationary
earnings
career, life
VERB + EXPECTATION
have, hold

You have unrealistic expectations.

differences in the expectations held by different social groups

establish, form

the way in which expectations are formed

base

These high expectations are based on the fast pace of technological developments.

arouse, build, build up, create, generate, raise, set, set up

the high expectations aroused by civil rights legislation

change, revise

Users have changed their expectations of library services.

heighten
lower, reduce, temper (esp. AmE)

Her approach sought to lower people's expectations.

manage

Here are some tips to help you manage your expectations for yourself.

influence, shape
come up to (esp. BrE), confirm, conform to, fit (esp. AmE), fit in with (esp. AmE), fulfil/fulfill, live up to, match, meet, reach, realize, satisfy

Her new car has not lived up to her expectations.

beat, exceed, go beyond, surpass
disappoint, fall short of

The reality of the cruise fell short of our expectations.

confound, contradict (esp. AmE), defy, violate (esp. AmE)

The rise in share price confounded expectations.

She has defied all expectations with her career.

EXPECTATION + VERB
grow, rise
change

In later years his expectations changed.

PREPOSITION
above expectation

Sales came in above expectations this week.

against expectation

Against all expectations, she was enjoying herself.

contrary to expectation

The building work was completed on time, contrary to expectation.

below expectation

What should you do when an employee's performance is below expectation?

beyond expectation

The course has produced results way beyond expectation.

He had been successful beyond his expectations.

in the expectation of, in the expectation that

They bought real estate in the expectation of a rise in prices.

expectation about

the government's expectations about the economy

expectation for

We have high expectations for her future.

expectation of

We certainly had a reasonable expectation of success.

expectation regarding, expectation with regard to

She has high expectations regarding the deal.

expectation surrounding

the tensions and expectations surrounding the show

PHRASES
have every expectation

I have every expectation of cheering the team on to victory in the final.

in line with expectations

Profits are broadly in line with expectations.


Collocations dictionary. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • expectation — [ ɛkspɛktasjɔ̃ ] n. f. • 1488; lat. exspectatio 1 ♦ Vx Attente. ⇒ expectative. « Harcourt tenait tout le monde en expectation » (Saint Simon). 2 ♦ Méd. Abstention de tout traitement (à l exception des mesures habituelles d hygiène et de… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Expectation — Ex pec*ta tion . [L. expectio. exspectio: cf. F. expectation.] 1. The act or state of expecting or looking forward to an event as about to happen. In expectation of a guest. Tennyson. [1913 Webster] My soul, wait thou only upon God, for my… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • expectation — UK US /ˌekspekˈteɪʃən/ noun [C, often plural] ► what you believe or hope will happen in the future: »Now the expectation is just 81 cents a share, according to a survey of a dozen analysts. expectation that sth »The banks help out the government… …   Financial and business terms

  • expectation — EXPECTATION. s. f. Attente. Il ne se dit que des grands evenements, des choses extraordinaires. Les peuples estoient dans une grande expectation, dans l expectation …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • expectation — I noun anticipation, assurance, awaiting, calculation, contemplation, expectance, expectancy, exspectatio, foreboding, forefeeling, foreknowledge, foresight, hope, intention, misgiving, opinio, preconception, presentiment, presumption, presurmise …   Law dictionary

  • expectation — 1530s, from M.Fr. expectation (14c.) or directly from L. expectationem/exspectationem (nom. expectatio/exspectatio) anticipation, an awaiting, noun of action from pp. stem of expectare/exspectare (see EXPECT (Cf. expect)). Related: Expectations …   Etymology dictionary

  • expectation — [n] belief, anticipation apprehension, assumption, assurance, calculation, chance, confidence, conjecture, design, expectancy, fear, forecast, hope, intention, likelihood, looking forward, motive, notion, outlook, possibility, prediction,… …   New thesaurus

  • expectation — Expectation, Expectatio …   Thresor de la langue françoyse

  • expectation — ► NOUN 1) belief that something will happen or be the case. 2) a thing that is expected to happen …   English terms dictionary

  • expectation — [ek΄spek tā′shən] n. [L expectatio < pp. of expectare: see EXPECT] 1. a looking forward to; anticipation 2. a looking for as due, proper, or necessary 3. a thing looked forward to 4. [also pl.] a reason or warrant for looking forward to… …   English World dictionary


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