disability


disability
noun
ADJECTIVE
chronic, profound, serious, severe, significant
mild (esp. AmE)

Many children with mild disabilities are integrated in general education.

lifelong, long-term, permanent

8 000 babies a year develop long-term disabilities resulting from this infection.

cognitive, developmental, emotional (AmE), intellectual, mental, physical, psychiatric (esp. AmE), psychological (esp. AmE)

children who have severe developmental disabilities

hearing, visual (both esp. AmE)

lectures for students with hearing disabilities

learning, reading (AmE)

Up to 20% have a learning disability.

hidden

those with a visible or a hidden disability

VERB + DISABILITY
experience, have, suffer, suffer from

patients who have suffered disability after stroke

cause

No one knows what causes learning disabilities.

cope with, live with

people who are learning to live with disability

diagnose, identify

an attempt to identify learning disability among children

overcome

She has overcome her disability to become an artist.

prevent

The drug's utility in preventing long-term disability is unproven.

DISABILITY + NOUN
movement, organization
discrimination
rights

an article on disability rights

activist (esp. AmE)

She was a vocal disability activist.

issues

Staff members have been educated in disability issues.

allowance, benefit, check (AmE), claim (esp. AmE), compensation (esp. AmE), pay (AmE), payment, pension

She saved the money from her monthly disability payments.

coverage (AmE), insurance (esp. AmE)
status (esp. AmE)

the criteria required for disability status


Collocations dictionary. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • disability — dis·abil·i·ty n pl ties 1: inability to pursue an occupation because of a physical or mental impairment; specif: inability to engage in any substantial gainful activity because of a medically determinable physical or mental impairment that can be …   Law dictionary

  • disability — dis‧a‧bil‧i‧ty [ˌdɪsəˈbɪlti] disabilities PLURALFORM noun 1. also disablement [dɪsˈeɪblmənt] [countable] a physical problem that makes someone unable to use a part of their body: • The law offers people with disabilities useful protection… …   Financial and business terms

  • disability — dis a*bil i*ty, n.; pl. {Disabilities}. 1. State of being disabled; deprivation or want of ability; absence of competent physical, intellectual, or moral power, means, fitness, and the like. [1913 Webster] Grossest faults, or disabilities to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • disability — 1570s, want of ability; see DISABLE (Cf. disable) + ITY (Cf. ity). Related: Disabilities …   Etymology dictionary

  • disability — *inability …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • disability — [n] disadvantage, restriction affliction, ailment, defect, detriment, disqualification, drawback, impairment, inability, incapacity, incompetency, inexperience, infirmity, injury, invalidity, lack, unfitness, weakness; concepts 309,316,410 Ant.… …   New thesaurus

  • disability — ► NOUN (pl. disabilities) 1) a physical or mental condition that limits a person s movements, senses, or activities. 2) a disadvantage or handicap …   English terms dictionary

  • disability — [dis΄ə bil′ə tē, dis′ə bil′ə tē] n. pl. disabilities 1. a disabled condition 2. that which disables, as an illness, injury, or physical handicap 3. a legal disqualification or incapacity 4. something that restricts; limitation; disadvantage …   English World dictionary

  • Disability — Disabled redirects here. For the poem by Wilfred Owen, see Disabled (poem). Disabilities redirects here. For the Middle Age restrictions, see Disabilities (Jewish). Disability …   Wikipedia

  • disability — The want of legal capability to perform an act. Term is generally used to indicate an incapacity for the full enjoyment of ordinary legal rights; thus, persons under age, insane persons, and convicts are said to be under legal disability.… …   Black's law dictionary

  • disability — The want of legal capability to perform an act. Term is generally used to indicate an incapacity for the full enjoyment of ordinary legal rights; thus, persons under age, insane persons, and convicts are said to be under legal disability.… …   Black's law dictionary


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