cease


cease
verb
ADVERB
altogether, completely, entirely

The noise faded, then ceased altogether.

all but, almost, virtually
largely
effectively

My job had effectively ceased to exist.

forthwith (formal, esp. BrE), immediately

These violations of the code must cease forthwith.

abruptly, suddenly

The bird's song ceased abruptly.

gradually
momentarily
eventually, finally
soon
long, long since

The conversation had long ceased to interest me.

PREPOSITION
with

Building ceased with the outbreak of war.

Cease is used with these nouns as the subject: ↑conversation, ↑fighting, ↑hostility, ↑movement, ↑rain
Cease is used with these nouns as the object: ↑fire, ↑hostility, ↑operation, ↑production, ↑publication

Collocations dictionary. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • cease — I verb abate, abrogate, abstain from, adjourn, annul, arrest, be all over, be at an end, be silent, become void, bring to an end, cancel, cause to halt, check, close, come to a close, come to a standstill, come to an end, conclude, consummate,… …   Law dictionary

  • cease — cease; cease·less; de·cease; sur·cease; cease·less·ly; cease·less·ness; …   English syllables

  • Cease — (s[=e]s), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Ceased} (s[=e]st); p. pr. & vb. n. {Ceasing}.] [OE. cessen, cesen, F. cesser, fr. L. cessare, v. intensive fr. cedere to withdraw. See {Cede}, and cf. {Cessation}.] 1. To come to an end; to stop; to leave off or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Cease — Cease, v. t. To put a stop to; to bring to an end. [1913 Webster] But he, her fears to cease Sent down the meek eyed peace. Milton. [1913 Webster] Cease, then, this impious rage. Milton [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • cease — [ sis ] verb ** 1. ) intransitive FORMAL to stop happening or continuing: Conversation ceased when she entered the room. The rain had almost ceased by the time we left. cease to exist: If we don t get more money, our community theater will cease… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • cease — This 14c loanword from French is slowly yielding to stop (as cast has to throw) except in a few set phrases (notably ceasefire and without cease) and where ‘we substitute it for stop when we want our language to be dignified’ (Fowler, 1926).… …   Modern English usage

  • cease — (v.) c.1300, from O.Fr. cesser to come to an end, stop, cease; give up, desist, from L. cessare to cease, go slow, give over, leave off, be idle, frequentative of cedere go away, withdraw, yield (see CEDE (Cf. cede)). Replaced O.E. geswican and… …   Etymology dictionary

  • cease — ► VERB ▪ come or bring to an end; stop. ● without cease Cf. ↑without cease ORIGIN Latin cessare, from cedere to yield …   English terms dictionary

  • Cease — Cease, n. Extinction. [Obs.] Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • cease — [sēs] vt., vi. ceased, ceasing [ME cesen < OFr cesser < L cessare, to loiter, be idle < pp. of cedere, yield: see CEDE] to bring or come to an end; stop; discontinue n. [ME & OFr ces < v.] a ceasing, as of some activity: chiefly in… …   English World dictionary

  • cease to be — index decease, dissipate (spread out), expire, perish Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary


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