punch

{{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}}
noun
ADJECTIVE
good, hard, powerful
killer (BrE, figurative), knockout

Aluko landed a knockout punch.

This policy will deliver a knockout punch to the tourism industry (figurative)

sucker (= an unexpected punch)

He was knocked flat by a sucker punch.

one-two (AmE, usually figurative)

the devastating one-two punch of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

emotional (figurative)

The film packs a heavy emotional punch.

VERB + PUNCH
deliver, give sb, land, pack (usually figurative), swing, throw

She gave him a punch on the nose.

The X37 engine packs a powerful punch.

He can throw a powerful punch.

pull

He pulled his punches to avoid hurting his sparring partner.

She pulls no punches (= she says exactly what she thinks). (figurative)

get, take

Be careful what you say or you'll get a punch on the nose.

a boxer who knows how to take a punch

PREPOSITION
punch in

a punch in the stomach

punch on

She gave him a punch on the nose.

punch to

a punch to the jaw

{{Roman}}II.{{/Roman}}
verb
ADVERB
hard
lightly
playfully

She playfully punched him on the arm.

repeatedly
PREPOSITION
in

His attacker had punched him hard in the face.

on

She punched him on the nose.

PHRASES
kick and punch, punch and kick

He was repeatedly kicked and punched as he lay on the ground.

Punch is used with these nouns as the object: ↑air, ↑button, ↑buzzer, ↑fist, ↑hole, ↑key, ↑pillow, ↑stomach, ↑ticket

Collocations dictionary. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Punch — can refer to:Tools* Punch (metalworking), a tool used to create an impression in a metal * Punch (numismatics), an intermediate used in the process of manufacturing coins * Punch (typography), an intermediate used in the process of manufacturing… …   Wikipedia

  • Punch — /punch/, n. 1. the chief male character in a Punch and Judy show. 2. pleased as Punch, highly pleased; delighted: They were pleased as Punch at having been asked to come along. [short for PUNCHINELLO] * * * I English illustrated periodical… …   Universalium

  • punch — punch1 [punch] n. [prob. < var. of ponchon: see PUNCHEON1] 1. a) a tool driven or pressed against a surface that is to be stamped, pierced, etc. b) a tool driven against a nail, bolt, etc. that is to be worked in, or against a pin that is to… …   English World dictionary

  • Punch — Punch, n. [Hind. p[=a]nch five, Skr. pa?can. So called because composed of five ingredients, viz., sugar, arrack, spice, water, and lemon juice. See {Five}.] A beverage composed of wine or distilled liquor, water (or milk), sugar, and the juice… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Punch — Punch, n. [Abbrev. fr. puncheon.] 1. A tool, usually of steel, variously shaped at one end for different uses, and either solid, for stamping or for perforating holes in metallic plates and other substances, or hollow and sharpedged, for cutting… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • punch — Ⅰ. punch [1] ► VERB 1) strike with the fist. 2) press (a button or key on a machine). 3) N. Amer. drive (cattle) by prodding them with a stick. ► NOUN 1) a blow with the fist. 2) informal …   English terms dictionary

  • punch up — ˌpunch ˈup [transitive] [present tense I/you/we/they punch up he/she/it punches up present participle punching up past tense …   Useful english dictionary

  • Punch — Punch, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Punched}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Punching}.] [From {Punch}, n., a tool; cf. F. poin[,c]onner.] To perforate or stamp with an instrument by pressure, or a blow; as, to punch a hole; to punch ticket. [1913 Webster] {Punching… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Punch — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Punch puede referirse a: Punch y Judy, títeres tradicionales ingleses Punch (revista) Obtenido de Punch Categoría: Wikipedia:Desambiguación …   Wikipedia Español

  • punch|y — «PUHN chee», adjective, punch|i|er, punch|i|est. Informal. 1. having lots of punch; forceful; terse; hard hitting: » …   Useful english dictionary

  • Punch — Punch, n. [Prov. E. Cf. {Punchy}.] 1. A short, fat fellow; anything short and thick. [1913 Webster] I . . . did hear them call their fat child punch, which pleased me mightily, that word being become a word of common use for all that is thick and …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.