momentum


momentum
noun
ADJECTIVE
considerable, great, tremendous
irresistible, irreversible, unstoppable
initial
fresh (esp. BrE)

She gave fresh momentum to the campaign.

downward, forward, upward

There's no forward momentum in the movie.

political

There is plenty of political momentum behind the proposed changes.

VERB + MOMENTUM
have

The campaign for change now has considerable momentum.

build up, gain, gather, increase

The car gathered momentum as it rolled down the hill.

create, generate, give sth, provide
keep up, maintain, sustain
lose

The team has lost momentum in recent weeks.

regain
slow
MOMENTUM + VERB
build up, increase
carry sb/sth

Her momentum carried her through the door.

go

Their momentum has gone, and they feel they cannot fight any longer.

PREPOSITION
momentum for

We must keep up the momentum for reform.

momentum towards/toward

the irresistible momentum towards/toward reunification of the two countries

PHRASES
keep the momentum going

We have to keep the momentum of our sales operation going.


Collocations dictionary. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Momentum — (sächlich, lateinisch mōmentum, „(Dauer einer) Bewegung“) steht für: einen Film aus dem Jahre 2003, siehe Momentum (Film) ein Verfahren aus der Chartanalyse, siehe Momentum (Chartanalyse) die Investmentgesellschaft Momentum, die im Jahr 2002 von… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Momentum — Mo*men tum, n.; pl. L. {Momenta}, F. {Momentums}. [L. See {Moment}.] 1. (Mech.) The quantity of motion in a moving body, being always proportioned to the quantity of matter multiplied by the velocity; impetus. [1913 Webster] 2. Essential element …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • momentum — (n.) 1690s, scientific use in mechanics, quantity of motion of a moving body, from L. momentum movement, moving power (see MOMENT (Cf. moment)). Figurative use dates from 1782 …   Etymology dictionary

  • momentum — [mō men′təm, məmen′təm] n. pl. momentums or momenta [mō men′tə] [ModL < L: see MOMENT] 1. the impetus of a moving object 2. strength or force that keeps growing [a campaign that gained momentum] 3. Physics Mech. the product of the mass of a… …   English World dictionary

  • momentum — I index headway, impetus II index importance, stress (strain) Burton s Legal Thesaurus …   Law dictionary

  • momentum — impetus, *speed, velocity, pace, headway …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • momentum — The plural, though not often needed, is momenta, or informally momentums …   Modern English usage

  • momentum — [n] impetus, push drive, energy, force, impulse, power, propulsion, strength, thrust; concepts 641,712 …   New thesaurus

  • momentum — ► NOUN (pl. momenta) 1) impetus gained by movement or progress. 2) Physics the quantity of motion of a moving body, equal to the product of its mass and velocity. ORIGIN Latin movimentum, from movere to move …   English terms dictionary

  • Momentum — This article is about momentum in physics. For other uses, see Momentum (disambiguation). Classical mechanics Newton s Second Law …   Wikipedia

  • momentum — /moh men teuhm/, n., pl. momenta / teuh/, momentums. 1. force or speed of movement; impetus, as of a physical object or course of events: The car gained momentum going downhill. Her career lost momentum after two unsuccessful films. 2. Mech. a… …   Universalium


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