lead

{{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}}
noun
1 example set by sb
ADJECTIVE
moral (esp. BrE)
VERB + LEAD
give, take

The government should give a lead in tackling racism.

follow
PREPOSITION
lead in

We should follow their lead in banning chemical weapons.

lead on

corporations that have chosen to take the lead on the privacy issue

2 position ahead of other people
ADJECTIVE
big, clear, comfortable, commanding, good, healthy, huge, significant, sizeable, solid, strong, substantial

For the time being, China has a solid lead over India.

narrow, slight, slim, small
two-game, three-length, ten-point, etc.
overall
early
VERB + LEAD
be in, gain, have

She has a narrow lead over the other runners.

go into, move into, take

They took an early lead.

build (esp. AmE), build up, establish

The team has now built up a commanding lead.

hold, keep, maintain, retain
lose
regain, retake

They regained the lead with only a few minutes left to play.

put sb/sth (back) into

That game puts her back into the lead.

extend, increase, open (esp. AmE), open up, widen

Houston increased their lead to 13–7

He had opened up a small lead over his opponent.

give
PREPOSITION
in the lead, into the lead

We were struggling to stay in the lead.

lead over

This win gives the team a two-point lead over their closest rival.

3 main part in a play, show, etc.
ADJECTIVE
romantic
female, male
VERB + LEAD
play

Her big break came when she was chosen to play the lead in a Broadway musical.

sing

She sings lead on four tracks.

LEAD + NOUN
character, role
actor, actress, dancer, singer, vocalist, vocals
guitar, guitarist
4 clue
ADJECTIVE
good, promising, solid

Some promising leads are already emerging.

They have several solid leads in their investigation.

new
possible

The police are following every possible lead.

false

It turned out to be a false lead.

VERB + LEAD
have
find, get

Did you find any leads when you searched it?

At last we got a lead on the McCreary case.

follow, pursue
give
PREPOSITION
lead as to

He said that he has a lead as to where Dylan may be.

lead on

leads on the murderer's identity

{{Roman}}II.{{/Roman}}
noun
ADJECTIVE
molten
VERB + LEAD
be made of
LEAD + NOUN
pipe, piping
paint
shot
pencil
contamination, exposure, poisoning

Lead exposure can be harmful to everyone, especially young children and babies.

content, levels
industry, mine, mining
{{Roman}}III.{{/Roman}}
verb
Lead is used with these nouns as the subject: ↑flight, ↑footpath, ↑footprint, ↑general, ↑idea, ↑lane, ↑nerve, ↑passage, ↑path, ↑pipe, ↑road, ↑route, ↑street, ↑track, ↑trail, ↑tunnel, ↑wire
Lead is used with these nouns as the object: ↑army, ↑assault, ↑attack, ↑band, ↑boycott, ↑brigade, ↑campaign, ↑charge, ↑church, ↑class, ↑coalition, ↑congregation, ↑contingent, ↑convoy, ↑country, ↑coup, ↑crew, ↑crusade, ↑delegation, ↑demonstration, ↑development, ↑discussion, ↑division, ↑effort, ↑enquiry, ↑existence, ↑expedition, ↑faction, ↑field, ↑fight, ↑follower, ↑force, ↑group, ↑horse, ↑hunt, ↑initiative, ↑insurrection, ↑investigation, ↑league, ↑life, ↑lifestyle, ↑march, ↑mob, ↑movement, ↑mutiny, ↑nation, ↑negotiation, ↑opposition, ↑orchestra, ↑pack, ↑panel, ↑parade, ↑party, ↑poll, ↑pony, ↑prayer, ↑procession, ↑project, ↑protest, ↑race, ↑rebel, ↑rebellion, ↑regime, ↑research, ↑retreat, ↑revival, ↑revolt, ↑revolution, ↑rising, ↑search, ↑seminar, ↑side, ↑singing, ↑squad, ↑struggle, ↑syndicate, ↑task force, ↑team, ↑tour, ↑tribute, ↑troops, ↑uprising, ↑way, ↑workshop, ↑world, ↑worship
{{Roman}}IV.{{/Roman}}
verb
1 show the way
ADVERB
away, back, on, out

‘Lead on!’ said Casey.

VERB + LEAD
help (to)

Five people helping to lead a convoy of aid are feared dead.

allow sb to, let sb

Let me lead the way.

PREPOSITION
along, down, into, out of, through, to, etc.

She led them along a dark corridor to a small room.

PHRASES
lead the way

You lead the way and we'll follow.

2 go to a place
ADVERB
directly
back, down, up

An old track led back through the woods.

nowhere, somewhere (often figurative)

Often there are discoveries which lead nowhere.

PREPOSITION
from
onto

The glass doors lead out onto a rooftop garden.

to

a path leading from the village to the old church

3 cause
ADVERB
normally, usually
inevitably, inexorably, invariably

Industrialization inevitably led to the expansion of the urban working class.

certainly, likely, undoubtedly

It will almost certainly be a disaster.

Such actions would most likely lead to the decline of rural communities.

not necessarily

The use of soft drugs does not necessarily lead to a progression to hard drugs.

automatically

Business success does not automatically lead to financial success.

naturally

Discussion of a client's tax affairs will lead naturally into consideration of investment options.

in turn

These measures in turn led to an increased opportunity for independent music production.

directly
indirectly
eventually, finally, ultimately
VERB + LEAD
can, may, might, must
can easily, can only

Sugar and fat can easily lead to obesity.

may well, might well

The carbon tax might well lead to a doubling of prices for fossil fuels.

appear to, seem to
be expected to, be likely to, tend to

Worrying about your weight is more likely to lead to low self-esteem.

be bound to
PREPOSITION
to

the events that led eventually to war


Collocations dictionary. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Lead — (pronEng|ˈlɛd) is a main group element with a symbol Pb ( la. plumbum). Lead has the atomic number 82. Lead is a soft, malleable poor metal, also considered to be one of the heavy metals. Lead has a bluish white color when freshly cut, but… …   Wikipedia

  • Lead — (l[e^]d), n. [OE. led, leed, lead, AS. le[ a]d; akin to D. lood, MHG. l[=o]t, G. loth plummet, sounding lead, small weight, Sw. & Dan. lod. [root]123.] 1. (Chem.) One of the elements, a heavy, pliable, inelastic metal, having a bright, bluish… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • lead — lead1 [lēd] vt. led, leading [ME leden < OE lædan, caus. of lithan, to travel, go, akin to Ger leiten: for IE base see LOAD] 1. a) to show the way to, or direct the course of, by going before or along with; conduct; guide b) to show (the way)… …   English World dictionary

  • lead — Ⅰ. lead [1] ► VERB (past and past part. led) 1) cause (a person or animal) to go with one, especially by drawing them along or by preceding them to a destination. 2) be a route or means of access: the street led into the square. 3) (lead to)… …   English terms dictionary

  • Lead — (l[=e]d), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Led} (l[e^]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Leading}.] [OE. leden, AS. l[=ae]dan (akin to OS. l[=e]dian, D. leiden, G. leiten, Icel. le[imac][eth]a, Sw. leda, Dan. lede), properly a causative fr. AS. li[eth]an to go; akin to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Lead — Lead, n. 1. The act of leading or conducting; guidance; direction; as, to take the lead; to be under the lead of another. [1913 Webster] At the time I speak of, and having a momentary lead, . . . I am sure I did my country important service.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Lead — 〈[ li:d] n. 15; Mus.〉 Führungsstimme in einer Jazzband od. Popgruppe [zu engl. lead „führen“] * * * Lead [li:d ], das; [s], s [engl. lead, zu: to lead = (an)führen]: 1. <o. Pl.> führende ↑ Stimme (3 b) in einer [Jazz]band ( …   Universal-Lexikon

  • Lead — (von engl. to lead = „(an)führen“, [liːd]) hat unterschiedliche Bedeutungen: Lead (Titularbistum) Eine Stadt in der Nähe von Rapid City, siehe Lead (South Dakota). Leadklettern; Variante des Sportkletterns Marketing / Vertrieb: Die erfolgreiche… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • lead — 1 vt led, lead·ing: to suggest the desired answer to (a witness) by asking leading questions lead 2 n: something serving as a tip, indication, or clue the police have only one lead in the murder investigation Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law.… …   Law dictionary

  • lead — lead, led Lead is the present tense of the verb meaning ‘to go in front’, ‘to take charge of’, etc., and its past form is led. A common mistake is to use lead for the past form and pronounce it led in speech, probably on the false analogy of read …   Modern English usage

  • lead — [n1] first place, supremacy advance, advantage, ahead, bulge, cutting edge*, direction, edge, example, facade, front rank, guidance, head, heavy, leadership, margin, model, over, pilot, point, precedence, primacy, principal, priority, protagonist …   New thesaurus

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